First human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa: Study

First human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa: Study

First human ancestors evolved in Europe, not Africa: Study

Based on an analysis of fossil fossils of 7.2 million years, according to a recent study that the cleavage of the common lineage of apes and humans probably occurred in Europe and not – as usually in Africa. The results, published in two articles in PLoS ONE paper and describe a new scenario for the beginning of human history.
The common lineage of apes and humans separates hundreds of years ahead of schedule so far, according to research. The research team analyzed the two known specimens of the fossil hominids graecopithecus freybergi – a lower jaw of Greece and upper premolar of Bulgaria.
Using computed tomography, the internal structures of the fossils were visualized and showed that the roots of the premolars were largely merged.
“While apes generally have two or three different and divergent roots, graecopithecus roots converge and partially merge – a feature that characterizes modern humans, early humans and several pre-humans, including Ardipithecus and Australopithecus,” said Madelaine Bohme Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Paleoenvironment at the University of Tübingen in Germany.
The lower jaw, nicknamed “El Greco” by scientists, has other features of the dental roots, suggesting that the species graecopithecus freybergi could belong to the pre-human lineage. “We were surprised by our results, and pre-humans were previously known as sub-Saharan Africa,” said Jochen Fuss of the University of Tübingen.
In addition, it is graecopithecus hundreds of years older than the earliest pre-human potential of Africa, Sahelanthropus six to seven million years Chad.
The research team dated the sedimentary sequence of the fossil sites graecopithecus, Greece and Bulgaria with physical methods and had an almost synchronic age for both fossils – 7.24 and 7.175 billion years.
“This is the beginning of the era of Messina that ends with the complete dehydration of the Mediterranean,” said M. Bohme. “This dating allows us to move human chimpanzees in the Mediterranean,” said study co-author David Begun, a professor at the University of Toronto, Canada.
Current chimpanzees are the closest living relatives of humans. Where lived the last common ancestor chimpanzee-human is a central problem and much debated in paleoanthropology.
Researchers have assumed until now that the lines diverge are five or seven million years old and the first pre-humans evolved in Africa. The beginning of human history could be different if the pretensions of the new study are to be believed – and validated later.

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