Tur dal origins found in India, to aid patent bid

Tur dal origins found in India, to aid patent bid

Tur dal origins found in India, to aid patent bid

Hyderabad: Tur dal, an essential ingredient in Indian cuisine is “desi”, and its origins are found somewhere in Madhya Pradesh.
In an important finding that could help India register a patent on turdal, scientists from the International Agricultural Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) and eight other research institutes around the world have drawn the origin of the first Dal Tur or cultivated guandĂș or India.
India has lost patent battles over several plants because it could not be shown that they were of Indian origin.

Researchers trace the origin of the cultivated or domesticated turds in India while making a new genome or DNA sequence up to 292 varieties of this special legume. They also discovered new features such as resistance to various diseases affecting the culture and its insensitivity to the photoperiod (duration of the hours of light required to reach maturity). The study was published in the journal Nature Genetics on Monday night.
According to an ICRISAT communiqué, this breakthrough will lead to the development of superior varieties of legumes, allowing production and greater benefits for small farmers, better market value and a range of prices affordable for consumers, particularly for the poor . But crop yields remained stagnant over the past six decades.
Tur dal is grown on thousands of acres in Telang ana and AP. Scientists at the Institute of Biotechnology, Professor at Telangana State University Jayashankar Agricultural (PJTSAU), Hyderabad, were also part of the research group.
Rachit Dr. Saxena, Scientist (Genomics Pigeon), ICRISAT, said: “Research has mapped the similarities and differences between modern farmers, local varieties and wild species to reach the source and subsequent movement of South Asian pigeon pea Sub-Saharan Africa and, finally, in Central America and South America. ” ICRISAT Director General Dr. David Bergvinson said: “This discovery will help us to better understand the quality characteristics of the grain unlocking this crop’s enormous potential and enabling farmers to access high-value markets.”

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